Advertisement

Theme: Collaboration

  • Linda CandyEmail author
  • Ernest Edmonds
  • Fabrizio Poltronieri
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing book series (SSCC)

Abstract

This chapter explores the nature of collaboration in inter-disciplinary art and technology projects. It draws upon the COSTART project described in Chapter ‘A Million Millennial Medicis’. Other inter-disciplinary initiatives took place outside the academic context. For example, in 1996 the Wellcome Trust U.K. launched the ‘SciArt’ funding programme in response to a growing field of artists embarking on new projects in conjunction with scientists. Many of these initiatives are no longer active but nevertheless, the precedents were important in demonstrating the potential benefit for creative work. Communication for interdisciplinary collaboration, shared languages, cognitive styles, and the role of knowledge are all discussed. Finally, observed success factors for good collaboration are reported. The core chapter is followed by eight contributions on the subject from artists and researchers.

References

  1. Barr AH (1939) Art in our time: the plan of the exhibition. In: Art in Our Time. Ayer Publishing, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Candy L (1997) Computers and creativity support: knowledge, visualization and collaboration. Knowl Based Syst 10(1):3–13MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Candy L (2011) Research and creative practice. In: Candy L, Edmonds EA (eds) Interacting: art, research and the creative practitioner. Faringdon, UK, Libri Publishing Ltd. pp 33–59Google Scholar
  4. Candy L, Edmonds EA (eds) (2002) Explorations. In: Art and technology. Springer, LondonGoogle Scholar
  5. Candy L, Edmonds EA (2002) Modeling co-creativity in art and technology. In: Hewett TT, Kavanagh T (eds) Proceedings of the fourth international conference on creativity and cognition, ACM press, New York, pp 134–141Google Scholar
  6. Candy L, Edmonds EA (2003) Collaborative expertise for creative technology design. In: Cross N, Edmonds EA (eds) Proceedings of expertise in design, design thinking research symposium 6, University of Technology, Sydney, November 2003, Creativity and Cognition Studios Press, pp 295–310Google Scholar
  7. Candy L, Edmonds EA (2011) Interacting: art, research and the creative practitioner. Libri Publishing, Faringdon, UKGoogle Scholar
  8. Candy L, Ferguson S (2014) Interactive experience in the digital age. Springer Cultural Computing Series, SpringerGoogle Scholar
  9. Cohen H (2002) A self-defining game for one player, special section on creativity and cognition. Leonardo 35(1):59–64CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Creativity and Cognition Studios. https://www.creativityandcognition.com/about/. Accessed 28 May 2017
  11. Csikszentmihályi M (1996) Creativity: flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. Harper Perennial, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  12. Edmonds EA, Candy L, Fell M, Pauletto S, Weakley A (2005) The studio as laboratory: combining creative practice and digital technology research. Int J Hum Comput Stud 63(4):452–481 (Special Issue on Creativity and Computational Support)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Fischer G, Ostwald J (2003) Knowledge communication in design communities. In Bromme R, Hesse FW, Spada H (eds) Barriers and biases in computer-mediated knowledge communication. Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp 213–242Google Scholar
  14. Fischer G, Giaccardi E, Eden H, Sugimoto M, Ye Y (2005) Beyond binary choices: integrating individual and social creativity. Int J Hum Comput Stud 63:482–512CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Glinkowski P, Bamford A (2009) Insight and exchange: an evaluation of the Wellcome Trust’s Sciart Programme London. Wellcome Trust. www.wellcome.ac.uk/sciartevaluation. Accessed 28 May 2017
  16. Harris C (ed) (1999) Art and innovation: the xerox PARC artist-in-residence program. MIT Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar
  17. Mamykina L, Candy L, Edmonds EA (2002) Collaborative creativity. Communications of the ACM Special Section on Creativity and Interface, vol 45, no 10, pp 96–99Google Scholar
  18. Muller L, Edmonds EA (2006) Living laboratories: making and curating interactive art. In: SIGGRAPH 2006 electronic art and animation catalog. ACM Press, New York, pp 160–163Google Scholar
  19. Phalip J (2011) Creative communication in film scoring. Interacting: art, research and the creative practitioner. Libri Publishing, Faringdon, UK, pp 136–149Google Scholar
  20. Rowe A (2015) Immersion in mixed reality spaces. Ph.D. Thesis published by The Oslo School of ArchitectureGoogle Scholar
  21. Turnbull D, Connell M (2011) Prototyping places: the Museum. Interacting: art, research and the creative practitioner. Libri Publishing, Faringdon, UK, pp 79–93Google Scholar
  22. Wenger E (1998) Communities of practice: learning, meaning and identity. Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
  23. Zhang Y (2011) Investigating collaboration in art and technology. Interacting: art, research and the creative practitioner. Libri Publishing, Faringdon, UK, pp 122–135Google Scholar
  24. Zhang Y, Candy L (2006) Investigating collaboration in art and technology. Co-Design: International Journal of Co Creation in Design and the Arts, Interactive Art Collaboration (Special Edition), vol 2, no 4, pp 239–248CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Zhang Y, Candy L (2007) An in-depth case study of art-technology collaboration. In: Proceedings of creativity and cognition 2007. ACM Press, New York, pp 53–62Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Candy
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ernest Edmonds
    • 2
  • Fabrizio Poltronieri
    • 3
  1. 1.Creativity and Cognition Studios (CCS)University of Technology SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Institute for Creative TechnologiesDe Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK
  3. 3.Institute for Creative TechnologiesDe Montfort UniversityLeicesterUK

Personalised recommendations