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The Fast Track Project: Preventing Severe Conduct Problems in School-Age Youth

  • Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we provide an overview of the Fast Track project as an illustration of one new direction in prevention science. In 1993 Coie et al. described prevention science as a new research discipline being formed at the interface of a number of professional emphases and disciplines, including psychopathology, criminology, psychiatric epidemiology, human development, and education. Prevention science represents an effort to examine risk factors, change processes and intervention effects, using rigorous methodology, thus providing an empirical basis for early prevention efforts. Coie et al. suggested five principles integral to prevention science. Preventive interventions should: (1) address fundamental causal processes; (2) address risk factors before they become stabilized; (3) target those children who are at high risk for the negative outcome to be prevented; (4) optimally involve coordinated activities in multiple domains; and (5) incorporate developmental research.

Keywords

Conduct Problem Middle School Fast Track Friendship Group Prevention Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) grants R18 MH48043, R18 MH50951, R18 MH50952, and R18 MH50953. The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and the National Institute on Drug Abuse also has provided support for Fast Track through memoranda of agreement with the NIMH. This work was also supported in part by Department of Education grant S184U30002 and NIMH grants K05MH00797 and K05MH01027.

We are grateful for the close collaboration of the Durham Public Schools, the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, the Bellefonte Area Schools, the Tyrone Area Schools, the Mifflin County Schools, the Highline Public Schools, and the Seattle Public Schools. We greatly appreciate the hard work and dedication of the many staff members who implemented the project, collected the evaluation data, and assisted with data management and analyses.

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© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Tufts UniversityMedfordUSA
  2. 2.Duke UniversitySanta BarbaraUSA
  3. 3.The University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  4. 4.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  5. 5.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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