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Son Preference, Marriage, and Intergenerational Transfer in Rural China

  • Marcus W. Feldman
  • Shripad Tuljapurkar
  • Shuzhuo Li
  • Xiaoyi Jin
  • Nan Li
Part of the International Studies In Population book series (ISIP, volume 3)

Rural Chinese society has historically been dominated by a rigid male-centered patrilineal family system and virilocal marriage remains overwhelmingly dominant. Under this system, parents call in a daughter-in-law for each of their sons, and all sons are entitled to stay home after marriage and coreside with their parents for a period of time until family division occurs or until both of their parents pass away. A son’s offspring use his father’s surname to continue the family lineage. Family property is usually inherited equally among all sons, and sons are obliged to take care of their parents in their old age. By contrast, parents marry all of their daughters to other families, and these daughters as well as their future descendants are no longer regarded as members of their natal families. All rights, productivity, and services of daughters are transferred to their husbands’ families at the time of marriage, and they can neither inherit their natal family’s property nor do they have any formal obligation to take care of their natal parents in old age (Das Gupta and Li 1999).

Keywords

Fertility Decline Cultural Transmission Intergenerational Transfer Marriage Cohort Marriage Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcus W. Feldman
    • 1
  • Shripad Tuljapurkar
    • 1
  • Shuzhuo Li
    • 2
  • Xiaoyi Jin
    • 2
  • Nan Li
    • 3
  1. 1.Morrison Institute for Population and Resource StudiesStanford UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Population Research InstituteXi'an Jiaotong UniversityPeople's Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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