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Environment Problems in the Coastal Zone

  • Hideo Sekiguchi
  • Sanit Aksornkoae
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Systems and Continental Margins book series (CSCM, volume 11)

Understanding coastal dynamics and natural history is important in developing a better understanding of natural systems and human impacts in coastal zones. This chapter outlines the characteristics of sedimentary environments in coastal zones which must be understood in order to manage and preserve coastal environments.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Coral Reef Coastal Zone Mangrove Forest Coastal Erosion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideo Sekiguchi
  • Sanit Aksornkoae

There are no affiliations available

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