Advertisement

Uzbekistan

  • Barry Turner
Chapter
Part of the The Statesman’s Yearbook book series (SYBK)

Abstract

Evidence of human settlement from at least 2200 BC is believed to be that of the Oxus civilization which extended across central Asia from Turkmenistan to Tajikistan. The region came under the influence of the first Persian Empire, centred on Persepolis, from around 550 BC when it was known as Sogdiana. Alexander the Great conquered Sogdiana and the ancient Greek kingdom of Bactria in 327 BC, marrying Roxane, daughter of a Sogdian chieftain. Turkic nomads entered the area from the 5th century AD and control subsequently passed to Arabs, who introduced Islam to Transoxiana in the 8th century. The Persian Samanid dynasty, centred on the cities of Bukhara, Samarkand and Heart, held sway from around 875 AD for over a century, before falling to the Khara-Khanid Khanate.

Keywords

Presidential Election Democratic Party Silk Road Environmental Sustainability Index Soviet Socialist Republic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further Reading

  1. Bohr, A. (ed.) Uzbekistan: Politics and Foreign Policy. The Brookings Institution, Washington (D.C.), 1998Google Scholar
  2. Kalter, J. and Pavaloi, M., Uzbekistan: Heir to the Silk Road. Thames & Hudson, London, 1997Google Scholar
  3. Kangas, R. D., Uzbekistan in the Twentieth Century: Political Development and the Evolution of Power. New York, 1994Google Scholar
  4. Melvin, N. J., Uzbekistan: Transition to Authoritarianism on the Silk Road. Routledge, London, 2000Google Scholar
  5. Yalcin, Resul, The Rebirth of Uzbekistan: Politics, Economy and Society in the Post-Soviet Era. Ithaca Press, Reading, 2002Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Turner

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations