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The Reality: Implementation and Force Structure

  • Solomon M. Karmel
Chapter

Abstract

Wbile emerging strategic viewpoints outlined in the previous chapter appear to be universally endorsed by the high command as long-term objectives, in practice China’s army is an amalgamation of old and new. This means an activist, socialistic state still maintains a bloated armed force, which is called in to resolve sundry problems and conflicts. These range from infrastructural weaknesses to ethnic nationalist turmoil. The state is also committed to the public employment of citizens, and overstaffing in the military parallels overstaffing in most public offices and state enterprises.

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Notes

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© Solomon M. Karmel 2000

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  • Solomon M. Karmel

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