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The importance of disease in immunodeficient mice and rats

  • S. Sparrow
Chapter
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Abstract

The very features that make the immunodeficient animal so valuable in research also present those responsible for breeding and maintaining it with the greatest problems.

Keywords

Nude Mouse Interstitial Pneumonia Bronchial Epithelium Sendai Virus Harderian Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Medical Research Council 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Sparrow
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research Council Laboratory Animals CentreCarshalton, SurreyUK

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