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Conclusion: Learning About Social Movements from East Asia

  • Jeffrey Broadbent
Chapter
Part of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies book series (NCSS)

Abstract

Besides being fascinating accounts of social movements, what lessons for social movement theory do these chapters offer? Do they tell us anything about the role of culture in social movement theory? Do they introduce new concepts and theories that can expand our analytical toolkit? The concept of culture poses a challenge for the dominant structural-instrumental-mechanism school of social movement theory. Let us first review the origins and content of that challenge. Then we can assess what new tools may be emerging from East Asia.

Keywords

Social Movement Collective Identity Political Opportunity Subjective Orientation Protest Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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