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Health and Safety

  • Alan Griffith
  • Paul Watson
Chapter
  • 80 Downloads

Abstract

The construction industry continues to be one of the most hazardous industries within which to work. Each year, a considerable number of construction workers on site are injured, many seriously and some fatally, as a result of their work and the work of others. Over the last twenty-five years the construction industry has suffered a poor health and safety record. Although the rate of accidents declined during the 1990s, the industry still has a long way to go to ensure that the health, safety and welfare of its workers are constantly safeguarded. Everyone involved with a construction project has a responsibility for health and safety, none more so than site management. It is the duty of managers and supervisors to ensure that working conditions on site are safe and healthy so that operatives, other project participants and persons near to or visiting the site are not placed at risk.

Keywords

Personal Protective Equipment Safety Plan Construction Management Enforce Authority Safety Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Alan Griffith and Paul Watson 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Griffith
  • Paul Watson

There are no affiliations available

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