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Mining in Outer Space: Legal Aspects

  • Mahulena HofmannEmail author
  • Federico Bergamasco
Chapter
Part of the European Yearbook of International Economic Law book series (EUROYEAR, volume 9)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the international and domestic legal frameworks relevant for the upcoming space mining activities. After an introduction describing the space mining projects currently under development, as well as the main companies and countries involved, the first part is dedicated to the international legal framework: Prominent attention is dedicated to the Outer Space Treaty and to the rules concerning the principle of non-appropriation, the protection of the environment and the right of States to legislate in areas pertaining to the “global commons”, such as outer space and the celestial bodies. The relevance of the Moon Agreement is also assessed. The second part of the article focuses on the national perspective, providing an analysis of the obligations under the Outer Space Treaty relevant to the adoption of a national legal framework. The space mining legislations currently in force, i.e. the U.S. legislation and the legislation of Luxembourg, are subsequently examined. Building on the previous analysis, the concluding remarks present an evaluation of the legal framework and indicate the possible legislative developments de iure condendo.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of LuxembourgLuxembourgLuxembourg

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