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Conclusions of “Hazardous Chemicals Associated with Plastics in Environment”

  • Hrissi K. Karapanagioti
  • Hideshige Takada
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 78)

Abstract

The production of plastics increases, their applications are diverse, and land-based management of the end-of-life products is not perfect. These result in increased amounts of plastics to be supplied to the ocean through a variety of routes and plastic pollution to be a serious and urgent problem for the marine environment. Degradation causes plastic to break into smaller pieces and additives to leach. For some chemicals and under certain exposure scenarios, plastic debris can be a relatively important source of chemicals for some organisms. More research is required related to the abundance of floating plastics and microplastics in bottom sediments. Risk from plastic-mediated exposure to chemicals is not yet well-understood. New research points include the study of plastic degradation under environmental conditions, the desorption of additives as well as the effects to the environment and to human health, and the redesign of plastic materials and additives. Finally, an urgent measure to be taken considering long-term impact is the reduction of single-use plastics.

Keywords

Additives Bottom sediments Degradation Microplastics Single-use plastics 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of PatrasPatrasGreece
  2. 2.Laboratory of Organic GeochemistryTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan

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