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Application of the UNECE Environmental Conventions in Central Asia

  • Bo LibertEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 85)

Abstract

The chapter describes the UNECE environmental conventions and its present and potential application and impact on water management in Central Asia. The four main conventions – the Convention on Environmental Impact Assessment in a Transboundary Context, the Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes (Water Convention), the Convention on the Transboundary Effects of Industrial Accidents, and the Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters – are all of value for the development of environment and water cooperation in Central Asia. However, only three of the five countries are Parties to the Water Convention, and there are differing views among Central Asian countries how this and other conventions could be applied. It is proposed how a strengthened dialogue in the subregion could be developed on the basis of the UNECE Conventions.

Keywords

Amu Darya Aral Sea Central Asia Climate change Conventions Environmental Impact Assessment International water law Syr Darya Transboundary watercourses UNECE 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Ms. Iulia Trombitcaia, UNECE, is acknowledged as the main author for the text in reference [1] and for comments and discussions during the drafting of this chapter.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UN Economic Commission for EuropeUppsalaSweden

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