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Control of Saltwater Intrusion in Coastal Aquifers

  • Hany F. Abd-ElhamidEmail author
  • Ismail Abd-Elaty
  • Abdelazim M. Negm
Chapter
Part of the The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry book series (HEC, volume 73)

Abstract

Seawater intrusion occurs in many coastal and deltaic areas around the world. When saltwater travels inland to production wells, underground water supplies become useless. Intrusion of saltwater is the most common contamination occurrence in coastal aquifers. A number of several methods have been used to control seawater intrusion to protect groundwater reserves in coastal aquifers. Extensive research has been carried out to investigate saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Although some research has been done to investigate saltwater intrusion, however, only a limited amount of work has concentrated on the control of saltwater intrusion to protect groundwater resources in coastal areas which represent the most densely populated areas in the world, where 70% of the world’s population live. The coastal aquifers’ management requires careful planning of withdrawal strategies for control of saltwater intrusion. Therefore, efficient control of seawater intrusion is very important to protect groundwater resources from depletion. New methods to control saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers are presented and discussed in details; also the advantages and disadvantages of each method were highlighted. Finally, control of saltwater intrusion in Egypt, especially in the Nile Delta aquifer, is discussed. The possibility of applying new methods to control saltwater intrusion in Egypt is presented.

Keywords

Coastal aquifers Control Egypt Modeling Nile Delta Saltwater intrusion 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hany F. Abd-Elhamid
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ismail Abd-Elaty
    • 1
  • Abdelazim M. Negm
    • 1
  1. 1.Water and Water Structures Engineering Department, Faculty of EngineeringZagazig UniversityZagazigEgypt

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