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The challenge of effectively integrating graphics into hypertext

  • Keith Instone
  • Erik Brown
  • Laura Leventhal
  • Barbee Teasley
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 753)

Abstract

It is important that designers of hypertext do not assume that the way information is presented in traditional media such as paper books will necessarily be effective in hypertext. Several studies have shown that graphics presented with text on a screen are not necessarily used effectively, or even used at all. In our study, we explored three ways of presenting textual and graphical information about geographical locations and objects. In all cases, the user had to point with a mouse to a item name in order to see text, and the text appeared near the mouse cursor. In one presentation style, no graphic was present. In a second style, a graphic was present, but the text appeared as a caption. In the hypertext style, the user pointed to item names on the graphic. The results showed that the hypertext style resulted in about 20% better learning of both spatial information (which was illustrated by the graphic) and of information not illustrated by the graphic.

Keywords

Spatial Information Multiple Choice Question Graphical Information Interaction Style Mouse Cursor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Instone
    • 1
  • Erik Brown
    • 1
  • Laura Leventhal
    • 1
  • Barbee Teasley
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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