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Instruction as reasoning about multiple objectives

  • Kwok -Keung Yum
  • Thomas J. Richards
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 608)

Abstract

This paper describes a three-tier architecture for general intelligent tutoring systems — at the top level are the general objectives and their reasoning that infer, control and explain the instruction strategies; at the middle level is the planning mechanism that resolves the needs for the general behaviour of teaching; and at the bottom level is the execution of methods that reflect the specific behaviour of teaching.

We also present a knowledge representation for general instructional objectives and their reasoning mechanism. Two fundamental design issues are addressed: (a) the epistemological adequacy of the objectives — easy to interpret for human and machine alike; and (b) the generality of the objectives — independent of the subject matter. We argue that the proposed architecture and knowledge representation can support an “instructional objectives first” approach which help to develop ITSs efficiently and communicate the studies to other researchers.

Keywords

Knowledge Representation Procedural Knowledge Declarative Knowledge Intelligent Tutor System Subject Matter Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwok -Keung Yum
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Richards
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Computer EngineeringLa Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia

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