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Shared vs separate inverted files

  • Elisabetta Grazzini
  • Fabio Pippolini
Data Sharing
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 367)

Abstract

In this paper, two different structures for inverted files are analyzed and compared. The structures are called shared and separate inverted files. In the shared inverted file, the access keys can handle all the information usually handled by two separate inverted files. The results are given of some experiments which compare the shared structure with the separate one when the relational equi-join operation is executed. Moreover an evaluation is made of the memory space required by the shared and separate structures when a given application is taken into account.

Keywords

Execution Time Database System Main Memory Memory Space Shared Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabetta Grazzini
    • 1
  • Fabio Pippolini
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Sistemi e InformaticaUniversità di FirenzeFirenzeItaly
  2. 2.Istituto per le Applicazioni della Matematica e dell'InformaticaC.N.R.FirenzeItaly

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