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Children as Design Partners and Testers for a Children’s Digital Library

  • Yin Leng Theng
  • Norliza Mohd Nasir
  • Harold Thimbleby
  • George Buchanan
  • Matt Jones
  • David Bainbridge
  • Noel Cassidy
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1923)

Abstract

Most of today’s digital libraries (DLs) are not designed for children. To produce usable and useful DLs, designers need to ensure that good design features are incorporated, taking into consideration users’ needs. We describe our experience working with children as design partners and testers in building a children’s DL of stories and poems for 11-14 year olds, using a concrete example to demonstrate our design philosophy and research approach, The study provides insights on useful design features children’s DLs should have, and their importance to children. The initial work we have done highlights issues and provides a basis for the building of usable and useful digital libraries for children.

Keywords

Design Feature Digital Library Interface Design Participatory Design Engaging Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yin Leng Theng
    • 1
  • Norliza Mohd Nasir
    • 1
  • Harold Thimbleby
    • 1
  • George Buchanan
    • 1
  • Matt Jones
    • 1
  • David Bainbridge
    • 2
  • Noel Cassidy
    • 3
  1. 1.Middlesex UniversitySchool of Computing ScienceUK
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  3. 3.St.Albans SchoolUK

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