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Introduction to Amorphous Computing

  • Daniel Coore
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3566)

Abstract

The study of amorphous computing aims to identify useful programming methodologies that will enable us to engineer the emergent behaviour of a myriad, locally interacting computing elements (agents). We anticipate that in order to keep such massively distributed systems cheap, the elements must be bulk manufactured. Therefore, we use a conservative model in which the agents run asynchronously, are interconnected in unknown and possibly time-varying ways, communicate only locally, and are identically programmed. We present a description of this model, and some of the results that have been obtained with it, particularly in the areas of pattern formation and the development of programming languages that are specifically suited to our model. Finally, we briefly describe some of the ongoing efforts in amorphous computing, and we present some of the interesting and important problems that still remain open in amorphous computing.

Keywords

Cellular Automaton Pattern Formation Local Interaction Emergent Behaviour Computing Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Coore
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of the West IndiesMonaJamaica, WI

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