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Dealing with Global Infectious Disease Emergencies

  • David L. Heymann
Chapter
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Abstract

The microbes that cause human infectious diseases are complex, dynamic, and constantly evolving. They reproduce rapidly, mutate frequently, adapt with relative ease to new environments and hosts, and frequently breach the species barrier between animals and humans. Social, economic, and environmental factors linked to a host of human populations and activities can accelerate and amplify these natural phenomena. The ability of infectious diseases to spread internationally—carried by humans, insect vectors, food and food products, and livestock—has been greatly augmented by the pressures of a crowded, closely interconnected, and highly mobile world. When they spread internationally, infectious diseases often lead to global emergencies.

Keywords

West Nile Virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Atypical Pneumonia Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Heymann
    • 1
  1. 1.World Health OrganizationUSA

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