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Public Mental Health, Traumatic Stress and Human Rights Violations in Low-Income Countries

A Culturally Appropriate Model in Times of Conflict. Disaster and Peace
  • Joop T. V. 
  • M. De Jong
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Part of the The Springer Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Health Care Traumatic Stress Armed Conflict Public Mental Health 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Joop T. V. 
  • M. De Jong

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