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Trace Element Intake and Balance in Adults in Central Europe

  • Anke M. 
  • Glei M. 
  • Dorn W. 
  • Müller R. 
  • Vormann J. 
  • Müller M. 
  • Jahritz M. 
  • Seifert M. 
  • Holzinger S. 
  • Drobner S. 
  • Röhrig B. 
  • Rother C. 
  • Angelow L. 
  • Latunde-Dada G. O. 
Chapter

Summary

The iron and zinc intake decreased continuously between 1988 and 1996 whereas the copper, iodine and selenium intake was improved. Like the zinc and iron intake, the selenium, iodine and copper offer must be individually improved. This is particularly true for selenium in which an intake of <20μg/day takes effect on the tri-iodothyronin level in the blood serum. Under these conditions, a selenium supplementation improved the iodine status. The manganese, nickel and molybdenum offer of humans met the requirements. Fortunately, the aluminium, strontium, barium, titanium, lead, cadmium and mercury intake of adults with mixed diets has decreased and is at a harmless level. The purchase in supermarkets overcomes remarkable differences. These elements can get into individual households via herbs and vegetables cultivated in house gardens. Some elements (strontium, rubidium, lithium, vanadium and uranium) are abundantly offered via water and home-made beverages. The geological origin of the habitat, technological processes and the amalgam in tooth cement take effect on the human intake of ultratrace elements.

Keywords

Iron Intake Test Person Zinc Intake Mixed Diet Selenium Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anke M. 
    • 1
  • Glei M. 
    • 1
  • Dorn W. 
    • 1
  • Müller R. 
    • 2
  • Vormann J. 
    • 3
  • Müller M. 
    • 1
  • Jahritz M. 
    • 1
  • Seifert M. 
    • 1
  • Holzinger S. 
    • 1
  • Drobner S. 
    • 1
  • Röhrig B. 
    • 1
  • Rother C. 
    • 1
  • Angelow L. 
    • 1
  • Latunde-Dada G. O. 
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of NutritionFriedrich Schiller UniversityJenaGermany
  2. 2.Society of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry LtdErfurtGermany
  3. 3.Protina Pharmazeut LtdIsmaningGermany

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