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Peculiarities of Nonheme Iron Metabolism Upon Experimental Modelling of Rat Glial Brain Tumour. Perspectives for Diagnosis and Treatment

  • Olga M. Mykhaylyk
  • Natalie A. Dudchenko
  • Eugene A. Lebedev
  • Bogdan S. Shurunov
  • A. P. Cherchenko
  • Yu. A. Zozulya
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  • 17 Downloads

Conclusions

Our results have shown that nonheme iron status of rats is strongly affected already at the early stage of glial brain tumour growth. The ferritin iron indices increase essentially in the blood, liver, in the brain tumour and in the cortex symmetric to the tumour, i.e. the brain as a whole is enriched in ferritin iron in rats bearing glial brain tumour. A further work implies the estimation of the nonheme iron exchange parameters determined in the blood and brain tissues taken from patients bearing glial brain tumours and evaluation of their diagnostic power as well as testing of iron chelators as antiproliferative agents in the case of glial brain tumours.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Iron Chelator Transferrin Saturation Central Nervous System Disorder Nonheme Iron 
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olga M. Mykhaylyk
    • 1
    • 2
  • Natalie A. Dudchenko
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eugene A. Lebedev
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bogdan S. Shurunov
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. P. Cherchenko
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu. A. Zozulya
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Applied Problems in Physics and BiophysicsNational Academy of Sciences of the UkraineKyivUkraine
  2. 2.Institute of NeurosurgeryAcademy of Medical Sciences of the UkraineKyivUkraine

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