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The Effect of a Copper, Cobalt, and Selenium Bolus on Sheep from Three Upland Scottish Farms

  • A. M. Mackenzie
  • N. R. Kendall
  • D. V. Illingworth
  • D. W. Jackson
  • I. M. Gill
  • S. B. Telfer
Chapter
  • 21 Downloads

Conclusions

In conclusin, the sintered Cosecure© bolus significantly increased the selenium, cobalt and copper status of the lambs.

Keywords

Amine Oxidase Copper Deficiency Selenium Status Copper Status Plasma Copper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Mackenzie
    • 1
  • N. R. Kendall
    • 2
  • D. V. Illingworth
    • 2
  • D. W. Jackson
    • 2
  • I. M. Gill
    • 3
  • S. B. Telfer
    • 2
  1. 1.Animal Science Research CentreHarper Adams University CollegeNewportUK
  2. 2.Centre for Animal Sciences Leeds Institute of Biotechnology and Agriculture School of BiologyUniversity of LeedsUK
  3. 3.Thrums Veterinary GroupKirriemuirUK

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