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Can the Media Serve Democracy?

Essays in Honour of Jay G. Blumler

  • Stephen Coleman
  • Giles Moss
  • Katy Parry

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Introduction: Can the Media Serve Democracy?

    1. Stephen Coleman, Giles Moss, Katy Parry
      Pages 1-18
  3. Media Systems and Comparative Research

  4. Journalism, Democracy and the Public Interest

  5. Public Culture and Mediated Publics

  6. Changing Media, New Democratic Opportunities

  7. The Past, Present and Future of Political Communication

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 195-195
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 222-251

About this book

Introduction

This landmark collection brings leading scholars in the field of political communication to debate one of the most important questions of our age: Can the media serve democracy? For the media to be democratic, they must enter into a positive relationship with their readers, viewers and listeners as citizens rather than consumers who buy things, audiences who gaze upon spectacles or isolated egos, obsessed with themselves. The media's first task is to remind people that they are inhabitants of a world in which they can make a difference. By enabling citizens to encounter and make sense of events, relationships and cultures of which they have no direct experience, the media constitute a public arena in which members of the public come together as more than passing strangers.

Keywords

Media Democracy Public Sphere Journalism Public Service Broadcasting Blumler Political Communication Media Systems Comparative Research Research Methods broadcasting care communication culture democracy governance Internet media media studies participation Print public service broadcasting service social change television

Editors and affiliations

  • Stephen Coleman
    • 1
  • Giles Moss
    • 1
  • Katy Parry
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsUK

Bibliographic information