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Representations of Indian Muslims in British Colonial Discourse

  • Authors
  • Alex Padamsee

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Introduction

    1. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 1-10
  3. ‘Not at His Best in India’

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 11-11
    2. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 13-22
  4. 1857: Raising the Green Flag

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 47-47
    2. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 83-102
  5. The Indo-Muslim ‘Stranger’

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 143-143
    2. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 120-141
    3. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 145-149
    4. Alex Padamsee
      Pages 196-203
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 204-266

About this book

Introduction

This study questions current views that Muslims represented a secure point of reference for the British understanding of colonial Indian society. Through revisionary readings of a wide range of texts, it re-examines the basis of the British misperception of Muslim 'conspiracy' during the 'Mutiny'. Arguing that this belief stemmed from conflicts inherent to the secular ideology of the colonial state, it shows how in the ensuing years it produced representations ridden with paradox and requiring a form of descriptive segregation.

Keywords

bibliography conflicts discourse identity ideology India Indian perception society understanding

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230512474
  • Copyright Information Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, London
  • eBook Packages Palgrave History Collection
  • Print ISBN 978-1-349-54344-1
  • Online ISBN 978-0-230-51247-4
  • Buy this book on publisher's site