Hardy the Writer

Surveys and Assessments

  • Authors
  • F. B. Pinion

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 1-14
  3. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 15-23
  4. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 24-40
  5. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 41-55
  6. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 56-62
  7. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 63-79
  8. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 80-93
  9. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 94-111
  10. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 112-126
  11. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 127-151
  12. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 169-186
  13. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 187-210
  14. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 211-236
  15. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 237-249
  16. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 250-263
  17. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 264-281
  18. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 282-292
  19. F. B. Pinion
    Pages 293-306

About this book

Introduction

These essays are arranged progressively to indicate Hardy's development as a writer and thinker, and to present the major aspects of his work as a whole, linking the poetry and the prose at all appropriate stages. They suggest that 'his formative thought, the product of a period of conflict between new scientific philosophy and humanism on the one hand, and traditional Christian theology combined with Victorian restraints on the other, developed when England was not as intellectually provincial as Matthew Arnold had affirmed. Above all, they illustrate the extent to which the creative imagination and the style of Hardy the writer were stimulated and strengthened by literary influences...'. Important references are made throughout to his Life and Collected Letters.

Keywords

English literature fiction George Eliot prose

Bibliographic information