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The Myth of Civil Society

Social Capital and Democratic Consolidation in Spain and Brazil

  • Authors
  • Omar G. Encarnación
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. The Intellectual Terrain

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 3-14
    3. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 15-43
  3. Spain: Weak Civil Society, Strong Democracy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 45-45
    2. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 47-73
    3. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 75-101
  4. Brazil: Strong Civil Society, Weak Democracy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 103-103
    2. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 105-131
    3. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 133-160
  5. Comparative Perspectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 161-161
    2. Omar G. Encarnación
      Pages 163-176
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 177-233

About this book

Introduction

Almost irrespective of the geographic setting, the debate about the future of democracy in post-authoritarian societies is increasingly tied to the strength of civil society. A strong civil society is thought to be crucial to the emergence of successful democracies while a weak civil society is deemed the cause of flawed or frozen democracies. Using contrasting evidence from Spain and Brazil, this study challenges these widespread assumptions about contemporary democratization. It argues that it is the performance of political institutions rather than the configuration of civil society that determines the consolidation of democratic regimes.

Keywords

capital Civil society democracy democratization pain politics social capital thought

Bibliographic information