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© 2014

The Social Effects of Economic Thinking

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. William Van Lear
    Pages 1-4
  3. William Van Lear
    Pages 5-35
  4. William Van Lear
    Pages 36-51
  5. William Van Lear
    Pages 52-70
  6. William Van Lear
    Pages 89-109
  7. William Van Lear
    Pages 110-131
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 132-138

About this book

Introduction

The book explains how social outcomes result from the influence of economic ideas which are themselves strongly impacted by the distribution of power in society. The book examines policies and programs of contending interests, emphasizing the importance of socio-economic issues stemming from quasi-economic stagnation.

Keywords

economic growth economic history employment growth income income distribution policy

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Belmont Abbey CollegeUSA

About the authors

William Van Lear is a professor of Economics at Belmont Abbey College, Belmont, USA.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"This book provides a thoughtful, comprehensive examination of the connection between economic forces and social policy. Issues such as income distribution and government spending are of greater concern to most Americans as the gaps between social classes continue to widen. Van Lear provides a compelling argument for why every American should be more concerned about the declining vitality of our economy and the implications it holds for our future." - Jennifer Szakaly, Belmont Abbey College, USA

"Van Lear provides a frank assessment of how we obtained the economic crisis of our current age. Ideology plays a fundamental role in shaping our political and social policy - unfortunately, contemporary neo-liberal ideology, which is radical lassie-faire economics, moves us in a social direction which is extremely averse to the human condition. Such an outcome is similar to the professed fears of the right, in which human agency becomes severely diminished. I highly recommend this text to any engaged sociologist, economist, or political scientist." - J. Michael Botts, Belmont Abbey College, USA