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© 2015

Faith, Secularism, and Humanitarian Engagement: Finding the Place of Religion in the Support of Displaced Communities

Book

Part of the Religion and Global Migrations book series (RGM)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Back Matter
    Pages 104-121

About this book

Introduction

Strengthening local humanitarian engagement demands not only rethinking dominant understandings of religion, but also revisiting the principles and practices of humanitarianism. This book articulates key aspects of the 'transborder discourse' necessary for humanitarian dialogue in the 21st century.

Keywords

21st century bibliography dialogue discourse prologue religion understanding philosophy politics prologue religion secularism society sociology understanding

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Global Health and DevelopmentQueen Margaret UniversityEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.San Diego Organizing ProjectUSA

About the authors

Author Alastair Ager: Alastair Ager is Director of the Institute for Global Health and Development, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK and Professor of Population and Family Health, Columbia University, New York, USA. Author Alastair Ager: Alastair Ager is Director of the Institute for Global Health and Development, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK and Professor of Population and Family Health, Columbia University, New York, USA. Author Joey Ager: Joey Ager is a community organizer, San Diego Organizing Project, USA. Author Joey Ager: Joey Ager is a community organizer, San Diego Organizing Project, USA.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

“This book is a valuable text for students, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers engaged with and in humanitarianism, irrespective of their direct or indirect engagement with matters of faith or faith leaders and communities. This is particularly pertinent given the continuing, dominant, and core narrative of the secular necessities of humanitarianism and the very real implications this narrative has for both policy and practice.” (Khatereh Eghdamian, Journal of Refugee Studies, Vol. 29 (3), September, 2016)