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© 2014

Parents of Children with Autism

An Ethnography

  • Authors
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Juliette de Wolfe
    Pages 1-5
  3. Juliette de Wolfe
    Pages 7-29
  4. Juliette de Wolfe
    Pages 31-46
  5. Juliette de Wolfe
    Pages 161-167
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 169-185

About this book

Introduction

In a readable and highly accessible ethnographic account that is shaped by the stories of families and the voices of parents, De Wolfe examines how parents of children with autism navigate the educational and medical systems, understand their own and their children's bodies, and support and educate one another.

Keywords

autism parents qualitative ethnography children communication education Familie Institution research

About the authors

Juliette de Wolfe is a Special Education Resource Teacher in the Arlington Public Schools, Arlington, Virginia, USA. She holds a PhD in Anthropology and Education from Teachers College, USA.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"A poignant, informative, and deeply thought-provoking study of parents as 'autism warriors'. Unlike those who have gone before her, de Wolfe shifts our focus away from families and organizations with ample resources. She looks at working-class parents who must fight for their kids' needs in contexts framed by limited resources and a lack of specialized, day-to-day help. This is a study of grassroots organizing from the ground up, a must read not only for other parents but for professionals, family members, and neighbors as a means to learn how autism parenting is inescapably a twenty-four-seven job, one performed with perseverance, determination, and dignity." - Lesley A. Sharp, Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, USA; Senior Research Scientist in Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA

"A sophisticated, sensitive, and extremely detailed and perceptive account of what it means to be an 'autism parent' in contemporary US society. De Wolfe does not parachute in and out of her informants' lives, but stays with them over the long haul and learns to view the world and their children through their eyes. Exemplary in terms of its concern for the dignity and humanity of its subjects, whose lives and struggles it depicts with great empathy." - Gil Eyal, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University, USA

"With this book, de Wolfe makes a triply significant contribution to defining discourses of the moment: autism, diversity, and education. With her steady, sensitive voice, she shows us how autism is best understood not as a static label but as a dynamic lived experience, and how conceptions of diversity are incomplete if they are not inclusive of disability. She explores how education is, in its most robust application to human development, the acquisition of new repertoires of practice in response to meaningful contextual demands." - Katherine Richardson Bruna, Associate Professor of Multicultural Education, Iowa State University, USA