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© 2014

Iberian Military Politics

Controlling the Armed Forces during Dictatorship and Democratisation

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Ambitions and Choices

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 3-12
    3. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 13-24
  3. Portugal

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 25-25
    2. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 27-46
    3. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 47-75
    4. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 76-107
  4. Spain

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 109-109
    2. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 111-128
    3. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 129-159
    4. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 160-190
  5. Comparisons and Explanations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 191-191
    2. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 193-217
    3. José Javier Olivas Osuna
      Pages 218-227
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 228-296

About this book

Introduction

By applying the nodality, authority, treasure and organisation public policy framework and neo-institutional theory to the dictatorship of Salazar and Franco respectively, this study explores the instruments that governments used to control the military and explains the divergent paths of civil-military relations in 20th Century Portugal and Spain.

Keywords

20th century Civil-Military Relations democracy dictatorship Government history Institution nation Policy politics Spain

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.The London School of Economics and Political ScienceUnited Kingdom

About the authors

José Javier Olivas is a Fellow and Associate to LSE IDEAS and the Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is also Co-founder and Editor of Euro Crisis in the Press, as well as Director of the online voting and debate platform Netivist.

Bibliographic information

Industry Sectors
Finance, Business & Banking

Reviews

“The analysis of forms of control of the military in these two regimes is novel and makes a useful contribution to the existing literature. This book will be of interest to researchers concerned with the nature of civil-military relations in non-democratic and democratising regimes.” (Thomas O’Brien, Journal of Contemporary European Studies, February, 2016)