Advertisement

© 2014

The Nature of Classification

Relationships and Kinds in the Natural Sciences

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 1-8
  3. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 9-27
  4. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 28-59
  5. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 60-84
  6. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 85-108
  7. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 109-124
  8. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 125-142
  9. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 143-161
  10. John S. Wilkins, Malte C. Ebach
    Pages 162-166
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 167-197

About this book

Introduction

Discussing the generally ignored issue of the classification of natural objects in the philosophy of science, this book focuses on knowledge and social relations, and offers a way to understand classification as a necessary aspect of doing science.

Keywords

analogy natural science philosophy of science science

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.University of MelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.University of New South WalesAustralia

About the authors

John S. Wilkins is Honorary Fellow at the University of Melbourne, and Associate Fellow at the University of Sydney, Australia. He works on evolution and religion, the philosophy of taxonomy, and the history of biology. He has published on cognition, cultural evolution, the philosophy of science, and on science communication.

Malte C. Ebach is Senior Lecturer in Biogeography at the University of New South Wales, Australia, and has published on systematic and biogeographical theory and methods. He is an editor for the Journal of Biogeography, Zootaxa and Editor-in-Chief of the Species and Systematics book series.
 

Bibliographic information

Reviews

“Wilkins and Ebach present an ambitious but well-motivated discussion for a theory-free classification which, if successful, would circumvent the problematic ladenness of observation. As such, The Nature of Classification succeeds in extending discussion of philosophy of classification beyond that of biological systematics and in forging a neutral terminology with which to do so.” (Catherine Kendig, History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, Vol. 37, August, 2015)