Advertisement

© 2013

WarTalk

Foreign Languages and the British War Effort in Europe, 1940–47

Book

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Languages at War book series (PASLW)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 1-11
  3. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 12-28
  4. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 29-47
  5. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 48-68
  6. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 69-90
  7. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 91-116
  8. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 117-134
  9. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 155-178
  10. Hilary Footitt, Simona Tobia
    Pages 179-186
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 187-222

About this book

Introduction

Offering a new perspective on the British experience of the Second World War in Europe, this book provides a series of snapshots of the role which languages played in the key processes of British war-making, moving from frameworks of perception and intelligence gathering, through to liberation/occupation, and on to the aftermath of conflict.

Keywords

Europe Interpreter Russia translation

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.University of ReadingUK

About the authors

Author Hilary Footitt: Hilary Footitt is Professor and Senior Research Fellow in the School of Languages and European Studies, University of Reading, UK. Her research interests include women in politics, war and liberation in France and the development of language policy. Previous publications include War and Liberation in France and Women, Europe and the New Languages of Politics. Hilary is Principal Investigator for the AHRC project, Languages at War, and is an editorial board member for the Journal of War and Culture Studies.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

'[WarTalk is an] unprecedented and painstaking elucidation specifically of the British war effort from a linguistic perspective. Hilary Footitt and Simona Tobia have made an x-ray study of the subtle, sometimes insidious, articulations and workings of language(s) that underlie more traditional war narratives.' - Michigan War Studies Review