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© 2012

Cuba Under Siege

American Policy, the Revolution and Its People

  • Authors
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Keith Bolender
    Pages 1-38
  3. Keith Bolender
    Pages 39-84
  4. Keith Bolender
    Pages 85-132
  5. Keith Bolender
    Pages 133-154
  6. Keith Bolender
    Pages 155-176
  7. Keith Bolender
    Pages 177-187
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 189-234

About this book

Introduction

For more than 50 years America's unrelenting hostility toward the Cuban Revolution has resulted in the development of a siege mentality among island leadership and its citizens. In a vibrant new look at Cuban-American relations, Keith Bolender analyzes the effects this has had on economic, cultural, and political life.

Keywords

Political Life revolution society

About the authors

KEITH BOLENDER is a freelance journalist living in Toronto, Canada and has written extensively on Cuban matters for a variety of North American publications. He is author of Voices From the Other Side: An Oral History of Terrorism Against Cuba. He is also a lecturer on the Cuban Revolution at the University of Toronto School of Continuing Education and a member of the Institute for Public Accuracy (IPA), where he is on their roster of experts for Cuban Affairs.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"Informed and judicious, this thoughtful study lifts the veil from some of the most shameful, and dangerous, episodes of recent American history, at the same time yielding valuable and penetrating insight into Cuban society and its current evolution, and not least into our own."

Noam Chomsky

"An excellent and provocative analysis of US policy to destroy the Cuban revolution and the siege mentality it has produced, on both sides of the Florida Straits. Essential reading for all who want to understand the absurdities of US foreign policy to Cuba and the need to change it. Well documented and clearly argued, this book is a first-rate study of a failed US strategy more than five decades and 11 presidents later."

John M. Kirk, Dalhousie University, Canada