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Venezuela, ALBA, and the Limits of Postneoliberal Regionalism in Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Asa K. Cusack

Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Asa K. Cusack
    Pages 57-92
  3. Asa K. Cusack
    Pages 93-117
  4. Asa K. Cusack
    Pages 153-189
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 213-218

About this book

Introduction

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the implementation, functioning, and impact of the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA), cornerstone of Venezuelan foreign policy and standard-bearer of “postneoliberal” regionalism during the “Left Turn” in Latin America and the Caribbean (1998-2016). It reveals that cooperation via ALBA’s regionalised social missions, state multinationals, development bank, People’s Trade Agreement, SUCRE virtual currency, and Petrocaribe soft-loan scheme has often been hampered by complexity and conflict between the national political economies of Ecuador, Dominica, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, and especially Venezuela. Shared commitments to endogenous development, autonomy within mutlipolarity, and novel sources of legitimacy are undermined by serious deficiencies in control and accountability, which stem largely from the defining influence of Venezuela’s dysfunctional economy and governance. This dual dependency on Venezuela leaves the future of ALBA hanging in the balance.

Asa K. Cusack (Latin America and Caribbean Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK) received his PhD in Latin American and Caribbean political economy from the University of Sheffield, UK, and has held research positions at University College London and the Institute of Latin American Studies.

Keywords

ALBA Venezuela Ecuador Caribbean Regionalism Postneoliberalism Trade Development Implementation Alternative regionalism Latin America Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America

Authors and affiliations

  • Asa K. Cusack
    • 1
  1. 1.Latin America and Caribbean CentreLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUnited Kingdom

Bibliographic information

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