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© 2018

Cyberpsychology as Everyday Digital Experience across the Lifespan

Benefits

  • Discusses how digital technology has influenced human experience and relationships

  • Approaches cyberpsychology from a new angle

  • Explores how various life stages influence and are influence by digital technologies

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiv
  2. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 1-22
  3. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 23-49
  4. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 51-76
  5. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 77-104
  6. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 105-132
  7. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 133-152
  8. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 153-173
  9. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 175-198
  10. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 199-225
  11. Dave Harley, Julie Morgan, Hannah Frith
    Pages 227-241
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 243-251

About this book

Introduction

Digital technologies are deeply embedded in everyday life with opportunities for information access and perpetual social contact now mediating most of our activities and relationships. This book expands the lens of Cyberpsychology to consider how digital experiences play out across the various stages of people’s lives. 

Most psychological research has focused on whether human-technology interactions are a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ thing for humanity. This book offers a distinctive approach to the emergent area of Cyberpsychology, moving beyond these binary dilemmas and considering how popular technologies have come to frame human experience and relationships. In particular the authors explore the role of significant life stages in defining the evolving purpose of digital technologies. They discuss how people’s symbiotic relationship with digital technologies has started to redefine our childhoods, how we experience ourselves, how we make friends, our experience of being alone, how we have sex and form romantic relationships, our capacity for being antisocial as well as the experience of growing older and dying. This interdisciplinary book will be of great interest to scholars and practitioners across psychology, digital technology and media studies as well as anyone interested in how technology influences our behaviour.

Keywords

cyberpsychology Online Identity Cyberbullying Digital Technology studies digital immersion media studies psychology of gaming Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Hyperpersonal theory Media Effects Research Digital exclusion older people and the internet Online Disinhibition Effect theory Problematic Internet Use (PIU) Rational Choice Theory (RCT)

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity of BrightonBrightonUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity of BrightonBrightonUnited Kingdom
  3. 3.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity of BrightonBrightonUnited Kingdom

About the authors

Dave Harley is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Brighton, UK. His broad research areas cover Cyberpsychology and Human Computer Interaction with a particular interest in older people’s use of digital technologies. In 2016 he completed a Culture and Communities Network+ research project looking at older people’s experiences of online community.

Julie Morgan is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Brighton, UK. Her research focuses on autobiographical memory, social anxiety and the development of social fears. She has also published research exploring the social dimension of nature-connectedness within mental health recovery.    

Hannah Frith is Principal Lecturer at the University of Brighton, UK. Her research centres on sexuality, embodiment and subjectivity including constructions of sexual consent/non-consent, orgasm and sexual pleasure, and the meaning of sexual practices. She previously authored Orgasmic Bodies published by Palgrave in 2015.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

“This text moves beyond the aim of other books in the realm of cyberpsychology that parse the positive and negative impacts of technology, incorporating a broad range of topics … . Written in a clear, seamless fashion, the text uses the complex topic of cyberpsychology to illuminate how context and motivation help shape the social and psychological experience of the user. This text is extensively researched and well documented, and will appeal to scholarly and general audiences alike.” (J. Bailey, Choice, Vol. 56 (5), January, 2019)​

“Cyberpsychology as Everyday Digital Experience across the Lifespan is a solid and compelling work that makes itself conspicuous through criticism, inclusiveness, interdisciplinary perspectives, and sharp points of view. This book offers a distinguishable approach to Cyberpsychology, and it will be of great interest to anyone who wants to decipher the complex relationship between technology and our lives.” (Camelia Gradinaru, Europe's Journal of Psychology, Vol. 14 (4), 2018)