Operations Research and Health Care

A Handbook of Methods and Applications

  • Margaret L. Brandeau
  • François Sainfort
  • William P. Pierskalla

Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 70)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Introduction

    1. Margaret L. Brandeau, François Sainfort, William P. Pierskalla
      Pages 1-14
  3. Health Care Operations Management

    1. Mark S. Daskin, Latoya K. Dean
      Pages 43-76
    2. Shane G. Henderson, Andrew J. Mason
      Pages 77-102
    3. William P. Pierskalla
      Pages 103-145
    4. Yasar A. Ozcan, Elizabeth Merwin, Kwangsoo Lee, Joseph P. Morrissey
      Pages 169-189
    5. Michael W. Carter, John T. Blake
      Pages 191-215
  4. Public Policy and Economic Analysis

    1. Rose Baker
      Pages 217-254
    2. Thitima Kongnakorn, François Sainfort
      Pages 255-274
    3. Jonathan P. Caulkins
      Pages 297-331
    4. Douglas K. Owens, Donna M. Edwards, John F. Cavallaro, Ross D. Shachter
      Pages 403-418
    5. Margaret L. Brandeau
      Pages 443-464
    6. Stephen E. Chick, Sada Soorapanth, James S. Koopman
      Pages 465-491
    7. Ruth Davies, Sally C. Brailsford
      Pages 493-518

About this book

Introduction

In both rich and poor nations, public resources for health care are inadequate to meet demand. Policy makers and health care providers must determine how to provide the most effective health care to citizens using the limited resources that are available. This chapter describes current and future challenges in the delivery of health care, and outlines the role that operations research (OR) models can play in helping to solve those problems. The chapter concludes with an overview of this book – its intended audience, the areas covered, and a description of the subsequent chapters. KEY WORDS Health care delivery, Health care planning HEALTH CARE DELIVERY: PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES 3 1.1 WORLDWIDE HEALTH: THE PAST 50 YEARS Human health has improved significantly in the last 50 years. In 1950, global life expectancy was 46 years [1]. That figure rose to 61 years by 1980 and to 67 years by 1998 [2]. Much of these gains occurred in low- and middle-income countries, and were due in large part to improved nutrition and sanitation, medical innovations, and improvements in public health infrastructure.

Keywords

Assessment Data-Envelopment-Analysis Operations Research Public Health Radiologieinformationssystem Scheduling Simulation calculus diagnosis linear optimization modeling

Editors and affiliations

  • Margaret L. Brandeau
    • 1
  • François Sainfort
    • 2
  • William P. Pierskalla
    • 3
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Georgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  3. 3.University of California at Los AngelesUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/b106574
  • Copyright Information Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2004
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4020-7629-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-8066-1
  • Series Print ISSN 0884-8289
  • About this book
Industry Sectors
Biotechnology
Pharma