Literature and Society

  • Authors
  • Charles I. Glicksberg

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VIII
  2. Introduction

    1. Charles I. Glicksberg
      Pages 1-15
  3. Asocial Literature

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 17-17
    2. Expressionism and the Aesthetics of the Absurd

      1. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 19-30
      2. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 31-45
    3. The Revolt Against Society: Anarchism, Alienation, the Beat Ethic and Madness

      1. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 46-56
      2. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 57-71
  4. The Literature of Social Criticism

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 73-73
    2. The Voice of Social Criticism

      1. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 75-82
      2. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 83-92
      3. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 93-105
      4. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 106-117
      5. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 118-124
    3. The Literature of Social Protest

      1. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 139-147
      2. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 148-155
      3. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 156-167
      4. Charles I. Glicksberg
        Pages 168-188
  5. The Literature of Social Commitment

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 189-189
    2. Charles I. Glicksberg
      Pages 191-197

About this book

Introduction

1. Prolegomena The purpose of this book is to examine anew and from a number of different perspectives the highly complex and controversial relation between literature and society. This is not meant to be a study in sociology or political science; the analysis of literature - its structure, content, function, and effect - is our primary concern. What we shall try to find out is how the imaginative work is rooted in and grows out of the parent social body, to what extent it is influenced in subject matter as well as form and technique by the domi­ nant climate of ideas in a given historical period, and to what degree and in what manner literature "influences" the society to which it is addressed. The stream of literary influence is of course difficult to trace to its putative source, for here we are not dealing, as in science, with isolated physical phenomena which can be fitted precisely within some cause-and-effect pat­ tern. The relationship between literature and society is far more subtle and complex than social scientists or cultural critics commonly assume.

Keywords

Bertolt Brecht English literature George Bernard Shaw Holocaust Shoah evolution individual literature politics realism socialist realism

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-4851-3
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1972
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-017-4619-9
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-4851-3
  • About this book
Industry Sectors
Consumer Packaged Goods