Physics of the Solar Corona and Transition Region

Proceedings of the Monterey Workshop, held in Monterey, California, August 1999

  • Oddbjorn Engvold
  • John W. Harvey

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-vii
  2. E. R. Priest, C. J. Schrijver
    Pages 1-24
  3. D. S. Brown, E. R. Priest
    Pages 25-33
  4. Karen L. Harvey, Harrison R. Jones, Carolus J. Schrijver, Matthew J. Penn
    Pages 35-44
  5. Dawn D. Lenz, Edward E. Deluca, Leon Golub, Robert Rosner, Jay A. Bookbinder, Christof Litwin et al.
    Pages 131-138
  6. Elena E. Benevolenskaya, A. G. Kosovichev, P. H. Scherrer
    Pages 145-151
  7. Jiong Qiu, Haimin Wang, Jongchul Chae, Philip R. Goode
    Pages 153-165
  8. David Alexander, Lyndsay Fletcher
    Pages 167-184
  9. B. W. Lites, G. Card, D. F. Elmore, T. Holzer, A. Lecinski, K. V. Streander et al.
    Pages 185-206
  10. Jack Ireland, Meredith Wills-Davey, Robert W. Walsh
    Pages 207-232
  11. Markus J. Aschwanden
    Pages 233-247
  12. Richard W. Nightingale, Markus J. Aschwanden, Neal E. Hurlburt
    Pages 249-265
  13. H. Aurass, B. Vršnak, A. Hofmann, V. Rudžjak
    Pages 267-293
  14. Leon Kocharov, Jarmo Torsti, Timo Laitinen, Matti Teittinen
    Pages 295-307

About this book

Introduction

Solar Physics publishes up to two Topical Issues per year that focus on areas of especially vigorous and active research. The present Topical Issue contains papers of recent results on the solar corona, as well as on the transition region and low solar wind. The majority of these papers, which were all refereed in accordance with the standards of Solar Physics, were presented in August 1999 at a workshop held in Monterey, California. The authors were offered the opportunity to present relevant parts of their contributions on an accompanying CD ROM of this Topical Issue. The Sun's magnetic field is responsible for the spectacularly dynamic and intri­ cate phenomenon that we call the corona. The past decade has seen an enormous increase in our understanding of this part of the solar outer atmosphere, both as a result of observations and because of rapid advances in numerical studies. The Yohkoh satellite has observed the Sun now for over eight years, producing spectac­ ular sequences of images that convey the complexity of the corona. The imaging and spectroscopic instruments on SOHO have added information on the cooler part of the corona. And since April of 1998 TRACE has given us very high resolution images of the 1-2 MK corona, at cadences that allow detailed observations of field oscillations, loop evolution, mass ejecta, etc.

Keywords

Corona Solar wind Sunspot Variation solar solar physics

Editors and affiliations

  • Oddbjorn Engvold
    • 1
  • John W. Harvey
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Theoretical AstrophysicsOsloNorway
  2. 2.National Solar ObservatoryTucsonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3429-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2000
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-481-5474-6
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-3429-5
  • About this book