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The Interpretation of Igneous Rocks

  • Authors
  • K. G. Cox
  • J. D. Bell
  • R. J. Pankhurst

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages iii-xiv
  2. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 1-11
  3. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 12-41
  4. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 42-82
  5. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 83-119
  6. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 120-144
  7. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 145-175
  8. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 176-196
  9. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 197-221
  10. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 222-257
  11. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 258-271
  12. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 272-282
  13. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 283-307
  14. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 308-331
  15. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 332-359
  16. K. G. Cox, J. D. Bell, R. J. Pankhurst
    Pages 360-396
  17. Back Matter
    Pages 397-450

About this book

Introduction

Our aim in writing this book is to try to show how igneous rocks can be persuaded to reveal some ofthe secrets of their origins. The data of igneous rocks consist of field relations, texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry. Additionally, experimental petrology tells us how igneous systems might be expected to behave. Working on this material we attempt to show how hypotheses concerning the origins and evolution of magmas are proposed and tested, and thus illuminate the interesting and fundamental problems of petrogenesis. The book assumes a modest knowledge of basic petro­ graphy, mineralogy, classification, and regional igneous geology. It has a role complementary to various established texts, several of which are descriptively good and give wide coverage and evaluation of petrogenetic ideas in various degrees of detail. Existing texts do not on the whole, however, deal with methodology, though this is one of the more important aspects of the subject. At first sight it may appear that the current work is a guidebook for the prospective research worker and thus has little relevance for the non-specialist student of geology. We hope this will prove to be far from the case. The methodological approach has an inherent interest because it can provide the reader with problems he can solve for himself, and as an almost incidental consequence he will acquire a satisfying understanding.

Keywords

chemistry classification crystal geochemistry geology igneous rock isotope magma mineral petrography petrology pluton plutonic rock solid solution volcanic rock

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3373-1
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1979
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-412-53410-2
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-3373-1
  • Buy this book on publisher's site