Coronary Pressure

  • Nico H. J. Pijls
  • Bernard De Bruyne

Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 195)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 1-4
  3. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 5-24
  4. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 25-47
  5. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 49-79
  6. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 81-120
  7. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 121-141
  8. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 143-156
  9. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 157-178
  10. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 179-187
  11. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 189-220
  12. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 237-259
  13. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 261-271
  14. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 273-285
  15. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 287-331
  16. Nico H. J. Pijls, Bernard De Bruyne
    Pages 333-339
  17. Back Matter
    Pages 341-344

About this book

Introduction

Cardiologists must answer three important questions when evaluating and treating patients with a coronary artery stenosis. As a physiologist: "What is the effect of this stenosis on coronary blood flow and myocardial function?"; as a clinician: " Is this lesion responsible for the patient's symptoms?"; and finally as an interventionalist: "Will revascularization of this artery improve the patient?" Fundamentally, the answer to these questions can be given to a large extent by measuring coronary pressure. That is the rationale of writing this book. 1. 1 Historical overview. Andreas Gruentzig and most interventional cardiologists in the early days of PTCA, had the intuitive feeling that pressure measurements could help to establish the severity of a coronary stenosis and to monitor the progress and result of a coronary intervention. At that time, measuring coronary pressure by the balloon catheter was part of a standard procedure. A residual transstenotic gradient of less than 15 mmHg was generally considered as a good result. Later, however, it turned out that measuring these (resting) gradients with balloon catheters was inaccurate an only had a limited prognostic value. Moreover, because there was no consistent theory to correlate pressure measurements to blood flow, the interest in measuring coronary pressures faded and disappeared almost completely with the introduction of new balloon catheters not intended for pressure measurement.

Keywords

PTCA Stent artery circulation

Authors and affiliations

  • Nico H. J. Pijls
    • 1
  • Bernard De Bruyne
    • 2
  1. 1.Catharina HospitalEindhovenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Cardiovascular CenterAalstBelgium

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-8834-8
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1997
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-015-8836-2
  • Online ISBN 978-94-015-8834-8
  • Series Print ISSN 0166-9842
  • About this book
Industry Sectors
Biotechnology
Pharma