Aspects of the Hague Rules

A Comparative Study in English and French Law

  • Authors
  • Malcolm Alistair Clarke

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XXX
  2. The Scope of the Brussels Convention 1924

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 3-7
    3. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 8-17
    4. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 18-28
    5. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 33-46
    6. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 47-72
    7. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 73-85
    8. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 86-95
    9. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 96-104
    10. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 105-109
  3. Due Diligence to Make the Ship Seaworthy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 111-111
    2. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 113-130
    3. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 131-170
    4. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 171-202
    5. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 203-213
    6. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 214-229
    7. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 230-239
    8. Malcolm Alistair Clarke
      Pages 240-253

About this book

Introduction

It has been estimated that four-fifths of an carriage of goods by sea are governed by the Hague Rules, properly known as the Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules Relating to Bills of Lading, signed at Brussels in 1924. The success of the Convention is wen recognised. Its importance is self-evident and such that, notwithstanding its success, it has been the subject of regular scrutiny with a view to improvement and reform. Attention has focussed on various matters, among them two central provisions which are the subject of this book. First to be considered is article X concerning the legal scope of the Convention: to which contracts for carriage under bills of lading does the Convention apply? This question has caused much trouble, was debated by the C. M. 1. for twenty years and was apparently settled by a new Conven­ tion signed at Brussels in 1968; but the solution may never come into force as the entire Convention is currently being considered by the United Nations with a view to reform of a different kind. The second part of the book examines one of the fundamental duties in the Convention. The ultimate duties of the carrier are duties of due diligence, diligence in caring for cargo and diligence in preparing his ship for sea. It is the latter duty that has been selected for detailed study.

Keywords

attention conflict conflicts English French nature reform state United Nations

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-8854-8
  • Copyright Information Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 1976
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-011-8199-0
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-8854-8
  • About this book