Religion and Economics: Normative Social Theory

  • James M. Dean
  • A. M. C. Waterman

Part of the Recent Economic Thought Series book series (RETH, volume 67)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Introduction

    1. James M. Dean, A. M. C. Waterman
      Pages 3-9
  3. Case Studies

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 11-11
    2. Andrew M. Yuengert
      Pages 33-50
    3. Thomas L. Schubeck
      Pages 69-84
    4. John P. Tiemstra
      Pages 85-98
    5. Kim Hawtrey
      Pages 99-112
  4. Interpretative Essays

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 113-113
    2. James M. Dean
      Pages 115-122
    3. Sheila C. Dow
      Pages 123-130
    4. Kenneth G. Elzinga
      Pages 131-139
    5. Fred S. McChesney
      Pages 153-163
    6. Ian Steedman
      Pages 165-173
    7. James M. Dean, A. M. C. Waterman
      Pages 175-183
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 185-205

About this book

Introduction

Normative Social Theory James M. Dean and A. M. C. Waterman University of Manitoba 1. Economics and Religion Once Again This hook is a sequel to Economics and Religion: Are They Distinct? (Brennan and Waterman 1994). That volume was motivated by a frustration born of many disappointing encounters between economists and theologians in the 1980s. Can bishops, synods, and other voices of organized religion bring any interesting (and disinterested) contribution to the public policy debate? If so, what is the relation of their contribution to that of the purely "secular" knowledge economists believe they can supply? Can economists bring any interesting (and disinterested) contribution to the public policy debate? If so, what is the relation of their contribution to the fundamental values that inform social ethics and that are still guarded to a large extent by religious tradition? All too often the two sides talked at cross-purposes. Well-intentioned economists coexisted for a few hours or days with well­ intentioned theologians whose manner of conceiving social reality was radically incompatible with their own. There seemed to be no common ground. The first requisite of any genuine conversation is an agreed conceptual framework that is able to accommodate the peculiar social vision both of the economist and of theologian, and to display the logical relation between the two.

Keywords

ETA economics ethics knowledge liberation theology religion social theory state technology

Editors and affiliations

  • James M. Dean
    • 1
  • A. M. C. Waterman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Economics, St. John’s CollegeUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-4401-8
  • Copyright Information Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-5891-9
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-4401-8
  • Series Print ISSN 0924-199X
  • About this book