Women’s Health in Menopause

Behaviour, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Hormone Replacement Therapy

  • P. G. Crosignani
  • R. Paoletti
  • P. M. Sarrel
  • N. K. Wenger
  • M. Meschia
  • M. Soma

Part of the Medical Science Symposia Series book series (MSSS, volume 7)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Introduction

  3. Introductory Issues

    1. Göran Samsioe
      Pages 41-50
    2. Peter Boyle, Tatiana Evstifeeva, Laura Luchini
      Pages 51-66
  4. Estrogen Replacement Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease

    1. Martin H. Birkhäuser, Willy Hänggi
      Pages 75-79
    2. Serge Rozenberg, Isabelle Liebens, Jean Vandromme, Anouk Hotimsky, Michel Van Rijsselberge
      Pages 89-98
  5. Prophylactic Oophorectomy: A Debate

  6. Behavior and Lifestyle in Perimenopausal Years

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Hormone Replacement

    1. Michele Meschia, Fiorenza Bruschi, Maurizio Soma, Fabio Amicarelli, Rodolfo Paoletti, Piergiorgio Crosignani
      Pages 125-132
    2. Philip M. Sarrel
      Pages 149-157
    3. Cesare R. Sirtori, Maurizio R. Soma
      Pages 159-169

About this book

Introduction

Few topics in women's medicine today are as fraught with confusion and controversy as the question of appropriate treatment for menopausal symptoms and the prevention of negative long term health outcomes common to post-menopausal women. Cardiovascular disease (CVD), osteoporosis, and cancer -- the most common causes of death, disability and impaired quality of life for women -- can potentially be prevented or forestalled by dietary, behavioral, and drug interventions. A better understanding of the natural history of the menopause is critical to providing better care. If women and their physicians have a better understanding of predictors of risk, they could make more informed decisions about interventions related to menopausal symptoms, CVD, osteoporosis and gynecologic and breast cancer. Few other recently introduced medical interventions have as great a potential of affecting morbidity and mortality as does hormone replacement therapy (HRT). HRT has produced effect on health risk: some are reduced, some are raised, and some uncertain, and these data are interpreted differently by various scientific, medical and consumer groups.

Keywords

cancer cardiovascular epidemiology metabolism prevention quality of life

Editors and affiliations

  • P. G. Crosignani
    • 1
  • R. Paoletti
    • 2
  • P. M. Sarrel
    • 3
  • N. K. Wenger
    • 4
  • M. Meschia
    • 5
  • M. Soma
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Pharmacological SciencesUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyYale University, School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.Department of CardiologyEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA
  5. 5.Clinica MenopausaMilanItaly
  6. 6.Institute of Pharmacological SciencesUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-1024-2
  • Copyright Information Kluwer Academic Publishers and Fondazione Giovanni Lorenzini 1994
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-4446-2
  • Online ISBN 978-94-011-1024-2
  • Series Print ISSN 0928-9550
  • About this book
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