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Belief and Probability

  • John M. Vickers

Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 104)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 1-14
  3. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 15-38
  4. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 39-60
  5. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 61-77
  6. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 78-95
  7. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 96-136
  8. Jaakko Hintikka, Robert S. Cohen, Donald Davidson, Gabriël Nuchelmans, Wesley C. Salmon
    Pages 137-159
  9. Back Matter
    Pages 160-208

About this book

Introduction

1. A WORD ABOUT PRESUPPOSITIONS This book is addressed to philosophers, and not necessarily to those philosophers whose interests and competence are largely mathematical or logical in the formal sense. It deals for the most part with problems in the theory of partial judgment. These problems are naturally formulated in numerical and logical terms, and it is often not easy to formulate them precisely otherwise. Indeed, the involvement of arithmetical and logical concepts seems essential to the philosophies of mind and action at just the point where they become concerned with partial judgment and" belief. I have tried throughout to use no mathematics that is not quite elementary, for the most part no more than ordinary arithmetic and algebra. There is some rudimentary and philosophically important employment of limits, but no use is made of integrals or differentials. Mathematical induction is rarely and inessentially employed in the text, but is more frequent and important in the apP'endix on set theory and Boolean algebra. • As far as logic is concerned, the book assumes a fair acquaintance with predicate logic and its techniques. The concepts of compactness and maximal consistency turn out to have important employment, which I have tried to keep self-contained, so that extensive knowledge of meta­ logical topics is not assumed. In a word, the book presupposes no more logical facility than is customary among working philosophers and graduate students, though it may call for unaccustomed vigor in its application.

Keywords

coherence concept conditional knowledge logic mathematics mind pragmatism predicate logic probability quantifiers subject

Editors and affiliations

  • John M. Vickers
    • 1
  1. 1.Claremont Graduate SchoolUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1158-7
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1976
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-010-1160-0
  • Online ISBN 978-94-010-1158-7
  • Buy this book on publisher's site