Justice, Law, and Argument

Essays on Moral and Legal Reasoning

  • Ch. Perelman
  • Harold J. Berman

Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 142)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Concerning Justice

    1. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 1-23
  3. Five Lectures on Justice

    1. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 24-33
    2. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 34-43
    3. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 44-54
    4. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 55-65
    5. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 66-75
    6. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 76-82
    7. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 83-87
    8. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 88-94
    9. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 95-106
    10. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 107-113
    11. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 114-119
    12. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 120-124
    13. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 125-135
    14. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 136-147
    15. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 148-162
    16. Ch. Perelman, Harold J. Berman
      Pages 163-174
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 175-188

About this book

Introduction

This collection contains studies on justice, juridical reasoning and argumenta­ tion which contributed to my ideas on the new rhetoric. My reflections on justice, from 1944 to the present day, have given rise to various studies. The ftrst of these was published in English as The Idea of Justice and the Problem of Argument (Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1963). The others, of which several are out of print or have never previously been published, are reunited in the present volume. As justice is, for me, the prime example of a "confused notion", of a notion which, like many philosophical concepts, cannot be reduced to clarity without being distorted, one cannot treat it without recourse to the methods of reasoning analyzed by the new rhetoric. In actuality, these methods have long been put into practice by jurists. Legal reasoning is fertile ground for the study of argumentation: it is to the new rhetoric what mathematics is to formal logic and to the theory of demonstrative proof. It is important, then, that philosophers should not limit their methodologi­ cal studies to mathematics and the natural sciences. They must not neglect law in the search for practical reason. I hope that these essays lead to be a better understanding of how law can enrich philosophical thought. CH. P.

Keywords

Epistemology formal logic justice logic morality philosophy

Authors and affiliations

  • Ch. Perelman
    • 1
  • Harold J. Berman
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre de Philosophie du DroitUniversité Libre de BruxellesBelgium
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-9010-4
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1980
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-277-1090-1
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-9010-4
  • About this book