The Impact of Climatic Variations on Agriculture

Volume 1: Assessment in Cool Temperate and Cold Regions

  • Martin L. Parry
  • Timothy R. Carter
  • Nicolaas T. Konijn

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. The Impact of Climatic Variations on Agriculture: Introduction to the IIASA/UNEP Case Studies

  3. Estimating Effects of Climatic Change on Agriculture in Saskatchewan, Canada

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 219-226
    2. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 227-257
    3. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 259-280
    4. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 281-292
    5. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 293-320
    6. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 321-349
    7. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 351-365
    8. Back Matter
      Pages 367-379
  4. The Effects of Climatic Variations on Agriculture in Iceland

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 381-388
    2. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 389-413
    3. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 415-444
    4. Martin L. Parry, Timothy R. Carter, Nicolaas T. Konijn
      Pages 445-474

About this book

Introduction

Three important studies were initiated in the 1970s to investigate the relation­ ship between climatic variations and agriculture: by the National Delcnse University (1980) on Crop Yields and Climate Change to the Year 2000, by the U.s. Department of Transportation (1975) on Impacts of Climatic Change on the Biosphere and by the U.S. Department of Energy (1980) on Environmental and Societal Consequences of a Possible CO -Induced Climatic Change (the ClAP 2 study). These were pioneering projects in a young field. Their emphasis was on measuring likely impacts of climatic variations rather than on evaluating possible responses, and they focused on first-order impacts (e.g., on crop yields) rather than on higher-order effects on society. A logical next step was to look at higher-order effects and potential responses, as part of a more integrated approach to impact assessment. This was undertaken by the World Climate Impact Program (WCIP), which is directed by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). The WCIP is one of four aspects of the World Climate Program that was initiated in 1979. At a meeting in 1982, the Scientific Advisory Committee of WCIP accepted, in broad terms, a proposal from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) for an integrated climate impact assessment, with the proviso that the emphasis be on impacts in the agricultural sector. Martin Parry was asked to design and direct the project at IIASA. Funding was provided by UNEP, IIASA, the Austrian Government and the United Nations University.

Keywords

agriculture biosphere climate climate change crop energy environment forest growth plant growth rice soil transport wind

Editors and affiliations

  • Martin L. Parry
    • 1
    • 2
  • Timothy R. Carter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicolaas T. Konijn
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of GeographyThe University of BirminghamUK
  2. 2.IIASAViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Soil ScienceAgricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2943-2
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-90-277-2701-5
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-2943-2
  • About this book
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