Melt Rheology and Its Role in Plastics Processing

Theory and Applications

  • John M. Dealy
  • Kurt F. Wissbrun

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 1-41
  3. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 42-102
  4. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 103-152
  5. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 153-178
  6. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 179-230
  7. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 231-268
  8. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 269-297
  9. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 298-344
  10. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 345-364
  11. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 365-389
  12. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 390-409
  13. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 410-423
  14. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 424-440
  15. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 441-490
  16. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 491-508
  17. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 509-530
  18. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 531-556
  19. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 557-566
  20. John M. Dealy, Kurt F. Wissbrun
    Pages 567-600

About this book

Introduction

This book is designed to fulfill a dual role. On the one hand it provides a description of the rheological behavior of molten poly­ mers. On the other, it presents the role of rheology in melt processing operations. The account of rheology emphasises the underlying principles and presents results, but not detailed deriva­ tions of equations. The processing operations are described qualita­ tively, and wherever possible the role of rheology is discussed quantitatively. Little emphasis is given to non-rheological aspects of processes, for example, the design of machinery. The audience for which the book is intended is also dual in nature. It includes scientists and engineers whose work in the plastics industry requires some knowledge of aspects of rheology. Examples are the polymer synthetic chemist who is concerned with how a change in molecular weight will affect the melt viscosity and the extrusion engineer who needs to know the effects of a change in molecular weight distribution that might result from thermal degra­ dation. The audience also includes post-graduate students in polymer science and engineering who wish to acquire a more extensive background in rheology and perhaps become specialists in this area. Especially for the latter audience, references are given to more detailed accounts of specialized topics, such as constitutive relations and process simulations. Thus, the book could serve as a textbook for a graduate level course in polymer rheology, and it has been used for this purpose.

Keywords

Applications plastics rheology

Authors and affiliations

  • John M. Dealy
    • 1
  • Kurt F. Wissbrun
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Hoechst Celanese Research DivisionSummitUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2163-4
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1999
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-0-7923-5886-2
  • Online ISBN 978-94-009-2163-4
  • About this book
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