Family Care and Social Capital: Transitions in Informal Care

  • Patrick Barrett
  • Beatrice Hale
  • Mary Butler

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xix
  2. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 1-15
  3. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 17-34
  4. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 35-52
  5. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 53-73
  6. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 75-90
  7. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 91-107
  8. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 109-128
  9. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 129-147
  10. Patrick Barrett, Beatrice Hale, Mary Butler
    Pages 149-158
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 159-170

About this book

Introduction

Becoming a caregiver is increasingly an inevitable experience for many people and, therefore, a likely life transition. Drawing on research and personal experiences of working with family caregivers, this book examines a range of family caregiving situations from across the life course. It seeks to capture the dynamics of caregiving in a number of common situations: caregiving during infancy, for adults who acquire a disability through accidents or illness, for older people with age-related issues, and caregiving by children and adolescent carers and grandparent carers. In drawing attention to key moments of vulnerability faced by family and informal caregivers, and by suggesting how to assist ‘reconnection’ at these moments, the book provides a guide for those working in the area of health, disability and care.

 

Informal care is conceptualised as occurring with the context of personal interrelationships, these being nested within wider kin networks and linked with wider professional formal care networks.  Informal care is seen both as an expression of social capital and as an activity that builds social capital.  It is an indicator of resources of mutual support within social networks, and it has the effect of adding to the stock of social resources.  The book makes a case, therefore, for facilitating the development of social capital by strengthening the capacity of informal caregivers and caregiver groups, and by improving the linkages with formal care organisations.

Keywords

Caregiving by adolescent carers and grandparent carers Caregiving by children Caregiving during infancy Caregiving for adults Caring across the generations Disability through accidents or illness Family caregiving situations across the life course Family carers Health, disability and care Informal care Informal caring and early childhood Kin networks Life transition Older people with age-related issues Personal interrelationships Professional formal care networks Social capital Social support

Authors and affiliations

  • Patrick Barrett
    • 1
  • Beatrice Hale
    • 2
  • Mary Butler
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Social SciencesUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Independent ResearcherDunedinNew Zealand
  3. 3.School of Occupational TherapyOtago PolytechnicDunedinNew Zealand

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6872-7
  • Copyright Information Springer Science and Business Media Dordrecht. 2014
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Humanities, Social Sciences and Law
  • Print ISBN 978-94-007-6871-0
  • Online ISBN 978-94-007-6872-7
  • About this book