Advertisement

Probabilistic Logics and Probabilistic Networks

  • Rolf Haenni
  • Jan-Willem Romeijn
  • Gregory Wheeler
  • Jon Williamson

Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 350)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Probabilistic Logics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 3-10
    3. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 11-20
    4. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 21-31
    5. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 33-48
    6. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 49-61
    7. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 63-71
    8. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 73-82
  3. Probabilistic Networks

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 83-83
    2. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 85-97
    3. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 99-105
    4. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 107-110
    5. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 111-117
    6. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 119-124
    7. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 125-131
    8. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 133-137
    9. Rolf Haenni, Jan-Willem Romeijn, Gregory Wheeler, Jon Williamson
      Pages 139-139
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 141-155

About this book

Introduction

While probabilistic logics in principle might be applied to solve a range of problems, in practice they are rarely applied --- perhaps because they seem disparate, complicated, and computationally intractable. This programmatic book argues that several approaches to probabilistic logic fit into a simple unifying framework in which logically complex evidence is used to associate probability intervals or probabilities with sentences. Specifically, Part I shows that there is a natural way to present a question posed in probabilistic logic, and that various inferential procedures provide semantics for that question, while Part II shows that there is the potential to develop computationally feasible methods to mesh with this framework. The book is intended for researchers in philosophy, logic, computer science and statistics. A familiarity with mathematical concepts and notation is presumed, but no advanced knowledge of logic or probability theory is required.

Keywords

Bayesian networks Bayesian statistical inference Computational logic Computational methods Credal networks Evidential probability Objective Bayesian epistemology Probabilism Probabilistic argumentation Probabilistic logic Probabilistic semantics Probabilities Probability Probability theory

Authors and affiliations

  • Rolf Haenni
    • 1
  • Jan-Willem Romeijn
    • 2
  • Gregory Wheeler
    • 3
  • Jon Williamson
    • 4
  1. 1.Inst. Informatik und, Angewandte Mathematik (IAM)Universität BernBernSwitzerland
  2. 2., Faculty of PhilosophyUniversity of GroningenGroningenNetherlands
  3. 3.Fac. Ciencias e Tecnologia (FCT)Universidade Nova de LisboaMonte CaparicaPortugal
  4. 4.School of European Culture &, LanguagesUniversity of KentCanterbury, KentUnited Kingdom

Bibliographic information